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Topic Wiki
+context

WikiWikiWeb was the first site to be called a wiki.[6] Ward Cunningham started developing WikiWikiWeb in 1994, and installed it on the Internet domain c2.com on March 25, 1995. It was named by Cunningham, who remembered a Honolulu International Airport counter employee telling him to take the "Wiki Wiki" shuttle bus that runs between the airport's terminals. According to Cunningham, "I chose wiki-wiki as an alliterative substitute for 'quick' and thereby avoided naming this stuff quick-web."[7][8]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiki#History

 

This video Wikis in Plain English by Common Craft provides an excellent explanantion of what wikis are and how the work:

 

Definitions

wikia's definition of a wiki: "A wiki is a website that you can edit. The word comes from "wikiwiki", a Hawaiian word for "fast". Wikis are designed to be collaborative so people can work together on a wiki project, so it's possible to build up a lot of content very quickly." http://help.wikia.com/wiki/Help:FAQ

+resources and best practices

Maintaining a vibrant wiki community is difficult and takes both work and comitment. Some say, "If you build it they will come," but in general it's just not that simple.

More wikis die than get adopted and used. You have to actively participate in your own wiki in order to ensure its survival. One thing you have to recognize is that a wiki is a community, whether you have chat, forums and/or blogs or not. Your community may be a workplace team or it may be a worldwide network, or anything in-between. Regardless, there are things you need to do to promote this sense of community and belonging, in order to maximize the effectiveness and usefulness of your wiki.

Read the rest of Grant Kruger's article here: Wiki Community

 

On working with a community of editors- what to include & censorship

GigsVT writes "Editors on Wikipedia are engaged in an epic battle over a few piece of paper smeared with ink. The 10 inkblot images that form the classic Rorschach test have fallen into the public domain, and so including them on Wikipedia would seem to be a simple choice. However, some editors have cited the American Psychological Association's statement that exposure of the images to the public is an unethical act, since prior exposure to the images could render them ineffective as a psychological test. Is the censorship of material appropriate, when the public exposure to that material may render it useless?"

http://yro.slashdot.org/story/09/07/14/1829231/Wikipedia-Debates-Rorschach-Censorship?from=rss

 

Leading social change with a network mindset
The revolution in communications technology — from social networking tools to conference call systems, blogs and wikis — is changing the way we work. A recent paper from the Monitor Institute, Working Wikily 2.0: Social Change with a Network Mindset, examines how grantmakers and nonprofits can advance social change by embracing principles such as openness, transparency, decentralized decision-making and distributed action. The authors explore when to ‘work wikily,’ what types of networks to use and eight lessons to help you start networking in order to achieve your goals. (The first lesson? “Design your experiments around a problem to solve, not the tools.”) The article concludes with a useful list of blogs, articles and books focused on networking.
(PDF) http://www.monitorinstitute.com/documents/WorkingWikily2.0hires.pdf
Phoebe Owens

 

+other

Recent Changes Camp was born from the intersection of wiki and Open Space. Since 2006, participants from all over North America and the globe have gathered together for a common purpose: discussing the past, present, and future of the technology and collaborative method that is wiki. RCC is a chance for everyone in the wiki community, something we like to call Wiki Ohana, to meet and have a fun, productive conversation about our passion for wikis of all stripes. -from http://2009rcc.org/RecentChangesCamp 02/20/09

Phoebe Owens

+discussion
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